• Will relaxed school-meal rules equal less waste?

    Peggy Kealoha, foodservice manager at Waiakea High School in Hawaii, says she hopes recently relaxed school-meal rules will lead to less waste and more consumption of meals. Relaxed rules affect sodium, whole grain and milk standards.

    West Hawaii Today (Kailua-Kona, Hawaii) (5/28) 


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  • Unpaid meal debt creates financial challenges for schools

    School lunch
     

    About 71% of school districts reported unpaid student meal debt during the 2012-13 school year, according to the School Nutrition Association. Unpaid meal debt in larger districts can reach as much as $4.7 million. Districts are working to tackle the challenge with formal and informal solutions. SNA spokeswoman Diane Pratt-Heavner recommends policies "that respect students while preventing escalating unpaid meal debts." The Atlantic online 


     

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  • Indiana's Lunch Meal Pattern Video
    The Indiana Department of Education has created an informational video for parents about the lunch meal pattern that focuses on the positive changes and success stories from the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. Click here to view the video!

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  • School Lunch Changes for the Better!

    Student in the school breakfast line All Duneland school cafeterias have implemented new meal pattern guidelines for school lunches. The new guidelines ensure that meals are healthy, well balanced and provide students the nutrition they need to succeed at school. School meals offer students milk, fruits and vegetables, proteins and grains, and also have strict limits on saturated fat and portion size. All school lunches meet new standards requiring:

    • Age-appropriate calorie limits.
    • Larger servings of vegetables and fruits (students must take at least one serving of produce) wider variety of vegetables, including dark green, red/orange vegetables and legumes.
    • Fat-free or 1% milk (flavored milk must be fat-free).
    • More whole grains.
    • Less sodium (Although the regulation for sodium reduction in school lunches does not go into effect until the 2014-2015 school year, our cafeterias will gradually begin to implement this guideline over the next couple of years.)

    Applying the new meal pattern guidelines to our menus will help provide your child/ren a high quality, nutritious lunch. We always strive to offer Duneland students’ healthier and delicious choices.

    School meals are a great value and continue to be a significant convenience for busy families. Meal costs are: Grades K-6 Breakfast -$1.35, Grades 7-12 Breakfast - $1.50, Reduced Breakfast $0.30, Grades K-6 Lunch – $2.45, Grades 7-12 Lunch $2.65, Adult Lunch $3.50. Parents can prepay online using mypaymentsplus.com, or at school by using a check or cash.

    Now is the perfect time to encourage your child/ren to choose school lunch. We look forward to welcoming your children to the cafeteria this school year. Find out more about Duneland’s healthy school meals by exploring the links to the left!

    Wishing you and your child/ren good health and much success for a GREAT 2013-2014 school year!

    Time to Look at Child Nutrition in A New Light

    Establishing healthful eating habits has lifetime benefits. The key to a healthful feeding relationship is a division of responsibility between the parents (caregiver) and child.
     
    Adults’ Feeding Responsibilities
    • Choose and prepare foods
    • Provide regular meals and snacks
    • Make eating times pleasant
    • Offer chances to learn new skills

    Children’s Eating Capabilities

    • Children know how much to eat
    • Children will grow predictably
    • Children’s eating will mature Make regularly scheduled meals a top priority.
    Don’t pressure or force children to eat.
    Be realistic about mealtime behavior.
    Model the habits you want children to develop.
    Share the joy of eating together.


      Are foods of minimal nutritional value available at school?
      Eating these snacks instead of a balanced meal promotes poor nutrition and diet deficiencies, as well as dental concerns. State and Federal guidelines prohibit the sale of these items during lunch serving times.

      Is the school lunch program addressing the current obesity issues that many school age children are having today?
      Definitely. The schools are reducing the fat content of foods served by introducing low and non-fat dairy products, baked products instead of fried foods, and increasing fresh fruits and vegetables as snacks instead of high calorie pre-packaged foods.

      Reducing fats, serving balanced meals, and increasing.physical activity at school and at home are ways we call all help our children have a healthier and happy lifestyle.

      Don’t forget that we serve breakfast every school day. It is hard on children to be Overweight. Use fruit and fresh vegetables for snacks. Reduce sweets, fatty chips and sugary drinks. Help kids to get active and exercise. It helps!

      How does the program address food allergies?
      All food allergies must be reported to the school nurse. You must bring in a written letter from your physician. Most schools have special tables for students with peanut allergies. The school nurse will inform the Food Service Department of all students with special needs.

  • This institution is an equal opportunity employer.